Lesson Plan: Fancy Feet

Lesson Plan Design, Implementation and Evaluation

Student Name: Dara Potocska

Date plan submitted: April 29, 2013

Date plan implemented with children or peers in class: April 29, 2013

CHD course title for which this plan was assessed: 145

Title of Activity: Fancy Feet

Ages of Children: 4

Format (check one box): large group □ small group □ individual □

Main Content Area (check box): □ Language and Literacy □ The Arts (music, movement, dance, drama, visual arts) □ Mathematics, □ Science □ Social Studies □ Physical activity/Physical education □ Health & safety

Organizational Procedures for Content:

1.                  Concepts: Creative movement, dance, gross motor, music sensitivity, color identification and cause and effect.

2.                  Alignment:

A5:      Have more control of body. Fine Arts Strand 1: Dance Arts. Milestones of Child Development, page 112.

A7:      Express feelings and ideas through drama and movement. Fine Arts Strand 1: Dance Arts. Milestones of Child Development, page 113.

A8:      Participate in creative movement, dance, and drama. Fine Arts Strand 1: Dance Arts. Milestones of Child Development, page 113.

B8:      Use music as an avenue to express thoughts, feelings and energy. Fine Arts Strand 2: Music. Milestones of Child Development, page 115.

D5:      Explore colors and shapes of objects. Fine Arts Strand 4: Visual Arts. Milestones of Child Development, page 118.

B10:    Respond to variations in music – pitch, volume, tempo, beat, rhythm, and pattern. Fine Arts Strand 2: Music. Milestones of Child Development, page 115.

D6:      Demonstrate beginning understanding of cause and effect, especially of own         actions. Approaches to Learning Strand 4: Reasoning and Problem-Solving.            Milestones of Child Development, page 66.

3.                  Learning Objectives: The students will interpret music and demonstrate movement skills through use of creative dance. Through questions proposed by the teacher(s) the students will demonstrate the ability to identify colors. The students will demonstrate comprehension of cause and effect through the mixing of colors.

4.                  Rational:

(1)        Music is important in young children because it helps develop the children’s self-esteem, creativity, self-confidence and curiosity. Movement with music is        important for young children because it helps to teach them about rhythm and             better motor coordination and development.

(2)        Color identification and understanding how colors can be brought together to        make new colors is important for children to teach them cause and effect,          organization and classification through likeness and differences and provides             children with further avenues of self-expression.

5.                  Prior Knowledge and Foundational Experiences:

(1)        Prior knowledge and foundational experiences with music will have been gauged by observing children in the music activity center during free time.

(2)        Prior knowledge and foundational experiences in gross motor movement will have been gauged by observing children during Music and Movement and Outdoor Play.

(3)        Prior knowledge and foundational experiences will have been determined through observation of children in the art activity center during free time and previous activities.

6.                  Materials and Aids:

Butcher paper, tempura paint (red, blue & yellow), trays (for paint), tarp, buckets, chairs, camera, towels, washcloths, water, scarves (for movement), CD player, a note to send home with parents about the potentially messy activity during the week and the need for an extra set of cloths, The Foot Book: Dr. Seuss's Wacky Book of Opposites by Dr. Seuss, The Ants Go Marching, Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy,

Instructional Procedures:

7.                  Advanced Organizers:

The lesson will begin with The Foot Book: Dr. Seuss's Wacky Book of Opposites by Dr. Seuss to introduce feet into the lesson. The students will be encouraged to offer input on the differences in feet and what those feet are doing and some introductory discussions on opposites. After reading the story with the students will have the music for the lesson’s activity introduced to them. The students will be encouraged to share their interpretation of what they thing is occurring in the music and what sort of movement might occur. The teacher will explain to the children that over the next few days they will do doing an activity where they will dance to the music they listened to previously, with paint on their feet. The teacher may play the songs again following this to further familiarize the students with the music and allow the students to dance.

8.                  Teaching Procedures:

Note: This lesson will take one week to complete. The project should be introduced on a Monday, the activity performed Tuesday-Thursday, and the conclusion presented on Friday.

[Day 1]

(1)        The children will sit down at the circle and the teacher will show and read The Foot Book: Dr. Seuss's Wacky Book of Opposites by Dr. Seuss.

(2)        The students will be given the opportunity to discuss what is occurring in the illustrations within the book, such as: opposites, size differences, types of feet and colors of feet.

(3)        After reading the book, the music for the lesson plan will be played to the children.

(4)        While listening to the music the children will be encouraged to share their ideas and interpretations of how the music makes them feel.

(5)        Following listening to the music, the teacher will explain the activity that will be occurring over the next several days to the children. The teacher will describe how the children will be dancing two at a time to music over the next several days  with paint on their feet and explain they will want to think about how the music feels and makes them want to dance.

(6)        The teacher will play the music again for the students and allow them the chance   to experiment with movements to the music.

(7)        Following the circle time, the children will be given the note for their parents.

[Day 2 - 4]

(1)        Students will be brought to the tarp if indoors or be taken outside if desired. Two students at a time will be allowed to dance while the rest of the students will be instructed to sit and watch.

(2)        For each group, 2 different paint colors will be provided (red & yellow, yellow & blue, blue & red)

(3)        Each group of 2 students will be given the chance to dance to one song each. They are allowed to use the scarves if they desire.

(4)        As the children dance, they will be encouraged to explain how they feel with the music and why they are moving as they are. They will also be asked to identify the color on their feet and the potential new colors that may occur when their footprints overlapped the other dancer’s.

(5)        Children not dancing will be sitting and watching the current dancers. They will be encouraged to discuss the music and included in the discussion about the colors on the paper and what colors are being made when the footprints overlap.

(6)        Following each pair of dancers, the children should have their feet washed and dried while the next group is set up to dance.

(7)        Each day’s activity should be given no more than 20 min total (about 3 songs and clean up time). Children who may have gotten paint on their clothing should be given time to change into any provided clean cloths.

[Day 5]

(1)        Students will sit down at the circle and the teacher will point out the paintings the children made with their feet now suspended from the ceiling.

(2)        The teacher will discuss the music with the students and have the students share what they thing the dancers were listening to by observing the footprints on the paper.

(3)        The teacher will also discuss the colors used and ask the children to identify all the colors and how the secondary colors were made. Time can be given to explain the terms, primary and secondary to the children concerning colors.

(4)        Following discussion the teacher made either play the music and have the children dance a final time or allow the children to be dismissed for free time.

9.                  Progress check throughout the lesson:

Questions and prompts the teacher can prompt the children include:

“How does this song make you feel?” “How are you moving right now?” “Why are you moving the way you are?” “Can you explain to me why you are doing that?” “What color is on your feet?” “What color might be made if you walk over the color on your feet?”

10.              Supportive Interactions / Facilitation:

While discussing the open ended questions, the teacher should be excited and interested in what the child(ren) are saying and discovering. Taking an active interest will aid in encouraging them to continue with the activity, furthering potential for learning. For children who may show signs of losing interest may go to library or cozy until the activity is over (the library should be stocked with books relating to feet, music, and color for the week).

11.              Conclusion:

The teacher will conclude the lesson in a group discussion about what the students did during the activity. The teacher will ask the students questions that reinforce their new knowledge and experiences from the lesson and assess what they may or may not have learned.

Children Learning Assessment Procedures:

To be sure the children have mastered or laid a better foundation for the needed movement skills, music awareness, and the concepts of color identification and cause and effect the children will have given verbal answers to questions posed by the teacher that display a firm grasp on the subject.


Considerations of variations in culture and abilities differences:

(1)  Children who are visually challenged will placed at a table with paint mixed sand or salt. As they music plays they will be given the opportunity to move their hands across the paper as they sense the music. Once the music has ended and the paint has dried, the children should be able to run their hands over the dried paint and feel the texture from the sand.

(2)  Children who may not have the use of their feet due to different disabilities will be placed at a table with paint and butcher paper. They will be given the opportunity to move their hands across the paper as they interpret from the music.

High-quality resources:

Milestones of Child Development, The Foot Book: Dr. Seuss's Wacky Book of Opposites by Dr. Seuss, [Song Titles Here]